Scandinavia

Utö Mines: Exploring 150-year-old Mines in Sweden

Diver places a cookie, 74m, in Stjernheim’s shaft. Photo by Anders Etander
Diver places a cookie at an intersection to show the way out, at a water depth of 74m in Stjernheim’s shaft. Photo by Anders Etander

The desire for adventure lies in wait and entices us… On Utö, there was an unexplored mine system. Follow Anders Etander down into the darkness, where the “In Water Under Land” exploration group had the privilege of diving in a place that has been untouched for 150 years.

Denmark's Øresund & Isefjord

Anemone, Øresund, Denmark. Photo by Morten Bjørn Larsen
Anemone on Anemone Wreck, Øresund, Denmark. Photo by Morten Bjørn Larsen

Diving in Denmark, how does it really measure up? Since Morten Bjørn Larsen lives in Copenhagen, he talks about his favorite dives in and around the island of Zealand, where the capital city is located. Several wrecks in Øresund and a bridge in Isefjord top the list.

Denmark: M/F Ærøsund

Ærøsund wreck. Photo by Lars Stenholt Kirkegaard
Diver on Ærøsund on the day it was sunk. Photo by Lars Stenholt Kirkegaard

M/F Ærøsund is a former ferry that served the islands in the South Funen archipelago. It was scuttled in 2014 in a sheltered bay just 550m off Funen’s southern coastline where it now rests at a depth of only 19m. It is easily visible from the surface.

Denmark: Diving & Dining

Beer and bridge, Little Belt, Denmark. Photo Peter Symes
Danish Carlsberg beer and the Old Little Belt Bridge where porpoises were spotted playing in the bay, Middelfart, Denmark. Photo Peter Symes

From the capital city of Copenhagen, across the Great Belt to Funen and the Little Belt to Jutland, travelling through the green fields of the Danish countryside, Scott Bennett describes his diving and dining adventure through Denmark, stopping along the way for a five-course meal at one of the 25 Micheline star restaurants found across the country.

Karlsruhe was a light cruiser which participated in Operation Weserübung, the invasion of Norway in 1940.

German WWII cruiser found between Norway and Denmark

Statnett, the Norwegian state-owned power grid operator, made the astounding discovery of the lost Karlsruhe cruiser around 488 meters (1,600 feet) below sea level off the Southern coast of Norway, some 13 nautical miles from the port of Kristiansand. Signs of wreckage were first detected three years ago during inspection work when sonar detected a shipwreck only 15 meters from an undersea power cable between Norway and Denmark.